Any Pinterest Users Out There?

Pinterest is supposed to be one of the hottest socialnetworking sites, but what exactly is the point? I know you use it like a bulletin board to pin photos and such that interest you, sort of lke a scrapbook, but then what?

And what if you don’t see things you like? That’s my problem — I don’t like “things.”

I get that it’s a fun site for most people, gives them something to play around with or dream about, but then what?

If you’re an author, how does that help you connect to readers? Or doesn’t it?

An author needs to be mindful of his or her “brand.” How does Pinterest help with branding?

Do you use Pinterst? What do you use it for? Do you find it fun, annoying, fascinating?

(This photo is from Second Wind Publishing’s Pins.)

Wild_Rose_-_saying

***

Pat Bertram is the author of the suspense novels Light Bringer, More Deaths Than One, A Spark of Heavenly Fire, and Daughter Am I. Bertram is also the author of Grief: The Great Yearning, “an exquisite book, wrenching to read, and at the same time full of profound truths.” Connect with Pat on Google+. Like Pat on Facebook.

13 Responses to “Any Pinterest Users Out There?”

  1. Marty Tousley (@GriefHealing) Says:

    I’ve been using Pinterest for some time now, Pat, and I love it. It’s yet another way to “get the word out” about whatever I find on the Internet that I think would be of interest to my bereaved clients and colleagues. The “pins” serve as links to articles, books, websites and other resources ~ if that is what you choose to use them for. As an example, you can check out my Grief Healing “board” here: http://pinterest.com/griefhealing/grief-healing/

    • Pat Bertram Says:

      So they don’t have to be just individual photos. Thank you. That’s good to know. Looking at your board, I can see that Pinterest could have some great applications.

  2. Holly Bonville Says:

    I have been using it for a while too. I pin tutorials so I don’t have to download anything to my computer and fill up the hard drive. Plus, I use it to pin pictures of things I want to make, decorating ideas and even some recipes. It has a lot of uses.

  3. Donna Fernandez Says:

    Interestingly, yesterday I wrote a relevant post on my blog, Flying Pages, (donnasfernandez.blogspot.com). View it to read how Pinterest has become my newbie favorite for storing ideas for writing inspiration, besides the tried-and-true ~ collect and write all things down.

  4. Donna Fernandez Says:

    Pat – I’ve seen Pinterest authors who’ve created a Board with a title “My Books,” and in a few other cases where an author will create a Board for separate (of theirs) published books. It is done. Also be sure your blog address is on your Pinterest site.
    I hope this helps.

  5. Juliana Says:

    I’ve tried pinterest, but I honestly can’t find anything I want to do. I loved to cook for my husband. Now I don’t want to cook, and I don’t want to eat. I’ve lost interest in so many things, and I know what you mean about “things” meaning nothing. Life, love, and peace are meaningful. Happiness is a luxury that grief doesn’t afford. I visited my husband’s memorial (ashes interred) today. It still drops me to my knees to see his name in stone. Will I ever be at peace with that?

    • Pat Bertram Says:

      Will you ever be at peace with that? How could you be? It’s a reminder that he’s dead, out of your life, gone leaving only a name behind.

      I couldn’t bear to see Jeff’s name in stone. I still have his ashes in the temporary urn, so there is no engraved box, no grave, no gravestone. It’s the only way I can deal with it.

      • Juliana Says:

        I think you’re wise. Having Ken’s ashes put in a National Cemetery was not my idea. Because Ken was retired military, I let the Commander of the American Legion guilt me in to having the honor guard, taps, etc. I didn’t do it until 3 months after Ken died. I was in such pain and didn’t want to do the wrong thing. I don’t think that Ken’s brother approved of how I handled his death, but then HE lives in Maine and didn’t even bother coming to the service (which was fine with me). After this year has passed since I had his ashes (I cheated…I still have some of them) placed in the cemetary, I have realized that I have allowed people to impose their ideas on my. I was vulnerable and didn’t know what to do. Interestingly enough, since then, the guy who talked me into it has quit speaking to me. Now THERE’S a blessing! Today, I have grown strong enough to tell him where he can put his ideas, and I guarantee you, it’s not sunny there. But it has taken me a year, horrid pain and confusion, and taking my life into my own hands to get me to the point where I don’t let people influence my decisions EVER!

        • Pat Bertram Says:

          I’m glad you kept some of his ashes. A minister friend told me to keep some, that people who don’t come to regret it, otherwise I probably would have scattered them all and been sorry. Or not have scattered them and felt guilty.

          It stuns me all the decisions we had to make when we are in such pain and so very vulnerable. But I hold tight to the thought that I will never feel like that again for the simple reason that he can’t die again. And yes, we do get stronger. And, after such misery, most things seem relatively trivial.


I'd love to hear what you have to say.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: