A Place Where I Can Connect With Myself And The Mystical World

It’s amazing we ever manage to communicate with each other, considering that different words mean different things to different people. We do have common ground, though, so perhaps that keeps us connected. We know basically what words mean, such as “desert,” “reading,” “writing,” but we also imbue the words with our own connotations, and that’s where it gets interesting.

For most people around where I am staying, “desert” means a place of rattlers, a place to ride dirt bikes, ATVs, and other noisemaking machines, a place to honk their dogs. (That’s what I call it anyway. They let their dogs run free and drive behind them, honking to keep the animal from straying too far.). But for me, “desert” means a place away from the bustle of everyday life, a place where i can connect with myself and the mystical world around me, a place where I get in touch with the truth inside me (the truth that resides in all of us.) Even those who do see the desert as a place away from every day life, see it as a place to run, all the while connected to an ipod or whatever is connected to those wires coming out of their ears.

For most people, “reading,” fiction, in particular, means entertainment, a way to kill a few hours, an indulgence in fantasy. There’s nothing wrong with that, of course — it makes people happy and fuels the book industry — it’s just not what reading means to me. For me, “reading” means a place away from the bustle of every day life, a place where I can connect with myself and the mystical world of books, and get in touch with the truth inside me. It came as a real shock when I discovered that’s not what reading means to others. It’s often true that people see reading as a place away from the bustle of every day life, but for most people it’s an escape from themselves, not an escape into themselves.

Writers each have their own meaning for the word “writing.” Most often it’s the same as reading — to entertain, to communicate with readers. Sometimes they don’t know what it means to them, except that it fulfills a need. Occasionally, it means a way of making money. It should come as no surprise that writing, for me, means a place away from the bustle of every day life, a place where I can connect with myself and the mystical world of my own story, and get in touch with the truth inside me. Writing bloggeries, such as this one, helps me figure out what I think, but writing fiction puts a “face” on what is inside me, creating a metaphor or a parable for my thoughts and experiences.

I’ve never been one to count words since the number of words don’t count. What counts is what the words say, what they mean. I’ve never been one to inform others of how my writing is going since the writing is for me. Once the book or bloggerie is published, however, it becomes something else, not something that was written so much as something to be read. Does that make sense? I might have walked too long in the desert this morning, and brought some of its mysticism back with me.

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4 Responses to “A Place Where I Can Connect With Myself And The Mystical World”

  1. rami ungar the writer Says:

    For me, reading and writing are joys, the easiest ways for me to relax, though sometimes if I have writer’s block, I get a little stressed writing.

  2. legionwriter Says:

    Bravo on the not counting words. I’m the same way. I’ve never been able to get into NanoWrimo, though I envy those who do. Much of time, I worry my writing is just me pissing in the grass.

    • Pat Bertram Says:

      I did Nano once — I hoped that by just putting down words without stopping to think what I was writing that something wonderful would happen. People always say that it does, but with me. All I ended up with was words.

      • jeffo Says:

        I did NaNo and it was very helpful-the pressure of a word count forced me to shut down my inner editor, which enabled me to actually finish what I started. It was the catalyst for me.

        I think a lot of us read, write, etc., for different experiences at different times, and uite often, we think we’re doing one thing (i.e., reading to be entertained), and we are, but we’re simultaneously doing something else (learning something about ourselves or our world). That’s the best kind of reading/writing.


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